George Conway pens op-ed calling for Trump impeachment proceedings

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Lawyer George ConwayGeorge Thomas ConwayCNN’s Jim Acosta: Trump is ‘crazy like a fox’ CNN’s Jim Acosta: Trump is ‘crazy like a fox’ George Conway knocks Trump: ‘You would have been fired from any other job by now’ MORE along with law professor Neal Katyal penned an op-ed published in the Washington Post Wednesday calling for impeachment proceedings against President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump judicial nominee withdraws amid Republican opposition: report Trump judicial nominee withdraws amid Republican opposition: report Cummings offers to delay contempt vote for Wednesday deadline on subpoenaed census docs MORE to begin.

Katyal and Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne ConwayKellyanne Elizabeth ConwayKellyanne Conway blasts Watergate witness testimony: Democrats ‘picking their lawyers from TV now’ Kellyanne Conway blasts Watergate witness testimony: Democrats ‘picking their lawyers from TV now’ CNN’s Jim Acosta: Trump is ‘crazy like a fox’ MORE and a frequent critic of Trump on Twitter, say Trump’s court filing arguing he cannot be investigated by Congress is the most recent indicator that lawmakers should begin impeachment proceedings.

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Trump “filed a brief in the nation’s second-most-important court that takes the position that Congress cannot investigate the president, except possibly in impeachment proceedings. It’s a spectacularly anti-constitutional brief, and anyone who harbors such attitudes toward our Constitution’s architecture is not fit for office,” the two men wrote.

The two lawyers wrote the brief is “nothing if not an invitation to commencing impeachment proceedings that, for reasons set out in the Mueller report, should have already commenced.”

Conway and Katyal are referring to an appeals brief filed by Trump’s lawyers in the U.S. District Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia that argues against the House Committee on Oversight and Reform’s ongoing probe into Trump’s business ventures and whether he broke the law by committing financial and tax fraud.

The brief reportedly says Congress is “trying to prove that the President broke the law” and that that’s something Congress can’t do, because it’s “an exercise of law enforcement authority that the Constitution reserves to the executive branch.”

The drumbeat of Democratic lawmakers calling for impeachment proceedings to begin has been growing, particularly increasing after special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerDem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Dem committees win new powers to investigate Trump Schiff says Intel panel will hold ‘series’ of hearings on Mueller report MORE gave his only public comments regarding the findings of his support.

To this point, House Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Health Care: Major doctors group votes to oppose single-payer | Panel recommends wider use of HIV prevention pill | New lawsuit over Trump ‘conscience protection’ rule Overnight Health Care: Major doctors group votes to oppose single-payer | Panel recommends wider use of HIV prevention pill | New lawsuit over Trump ‘conscience protection’ rule On The Money: Democrats set stage for next shutdown fight | House panel wraps up final 2020 spending bill | GOP senators, White House delay meeting on spending | Trump hits Fed over high interest rates MORE (D-Calif.) has tempered the conversation about impeaching Trump, pointing to the lack of Republican support outside of Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashThe Hill’s 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Trump, Biden headed to dueling Iowa rallies The Hill’s 12:30 Report — Presented by MAPRx — Trump, Biden headed to dueling Iowa rallies The Hill’s Morning Report – Warren’s moment: Policy plans and rising polls MORE (R-Mich.) who has been the only Republican to public support opening impeachment proceedings.

“Congress could investigate Trump’s finances in an impeachment proceeding, but it can do so without launching the formal process of impeachment,” they write, concluding that “Trump’s brief can be construed as an invitation to commence impeachment proceedings. In those proceedings, Trump’s attitudes toward our Constitution’s checks and balances, in addition to evidence of obstruction of justice, must play a key role.”